reducing secrecy

Secretary Nielsen’s Exit Would Leave Behind Trail of Secrecy About Border Policies, Missing children

If the president follows through on his threats to ask Secretary Nielsen to resign, she will leave the administration with a trail of unanswered questions about policies that destroyed the lives of hundreds of families. It will be up to Congress and the public to unearth her buried secrets about border policies, and ensure all the missing children are reunited with their parents. OTG’s appeal challenges DHS’ withholding of information that should be disclosed under law, including the improper use of redactions to hide information about record keeping systems used to track separated children.

Ivanka Trump and James Comey’s Emails from Personal Accounts Violate Presidential and Federal Records Acts

By sending emails in her official capacity as White House staff through a personal email account, Ivanka Trump violated the Presidential Records Act. Trump’s claim that she was not familiar with the details of rules prohibiting the use of personal email accounts for official business strains credulity, given the public and policymaker attention this matter has generated over the past several years. All officials should know better, and Democrats and Republicans should work together to curtail this growing problem.

To ensure accountability for use of lethal force, advocates look to Congress

So far, the Trump Administration has shown a willingness to accelerate the use of military force overseas, while continuing and sometimes expanding on the excessive secrecy of its predecessors.  As the number of civilian casualties from U.S. strikes grows at a shocking pace, government transparency and Congressional oversight may be the surest way to advance accountability in U.S. use of military force.

Updated: Questions for 2016 Candidates for Federal Offices on Government Accountability, Public Disclosure, and the Right to Know

OpenTheGovernment.org and the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) have drafted these open government-related questions that can be asked of all candidates for federal office.  Our hope is that they will be used broadly - by editorial boards, reporters covering the 2016 campaigns, and interested members of the public who have an opportunity to speak with candidates.

Coalition expresses support for DNI James Clapper in classification review

Today, OpenTheGovernment.org joined 11 organizations in a letter expressing support for Director of National Intelligence James Clapper's approach to the upcoming Fundamental Classification Guidance Review (FCGR) process. The letter commends DNI Clapper for his March memo to the heads of major intelligence agencies, stating that his hands-on approach promises a successful review. The groups also made two recommendations for how the FCGR could be even more effective in reducing the problem of overclassification: