Open Government Partnership - Resources

OTG releases civil society progress report on the Administration’s open government commitments

WASHINGTON, February 17, 2016 – OpenTheGovernent.org today released a report, developed by 23 civil society organizations, on the progress made by the Administration in its Open Government commitments over the last two years. Among the findings, the report highlights the shortcomings in the completion rate, lack of political mandate and follow-through, and need for greater focus on civil society/government collaboration.

Civil Society Groups Issue Progress Report on 2nd National Action Plan; Urge Administration to Take Meaningful Action

In a new report released today by OpenTheGovernment.org, civil society groups find that the U.S. government, despite some meaningful efforts, is not poised to fulfill many of the open government commitments made in its second OGP National Action Plan. In contrast to President Obama’s 2009 pledge to usher in a “new era of openness,” the White House has fallen short of civil society expectations and has not taken full advantage of the OGP platform to push through transformative openness initiatives.

OTG's Remarks at Open Government Public Meeting

On July 30th, the White House hosted a public meeting on open government. The meeting was intended to inform the administration's next National Action Plan (NAP) for open government. The Plan will be published in late October 2015.

OTG presented a selection of commitments from the Civil Society Model Plan. Watch our presentation and see the text of our statement below. The full program is available here.

Civil Society Groups Create Model National Action Plan

As part of engagement in the Open Government Partnership, the US government is required to develop an OGP country plan with concrete commitments on open government. The government makes public commitments to both domestic and international audiences and accountability for those commitments is built into the OGP process.

To set high standards for the US government's third plan, civil society groups created a model National Action Plan. OpenTheGovernment.org invited civil society groups and members of the public to submit their own model commitments through a Google site, and break down the big goals of openness into concrete steps that could be reasonably taken over a year's time. Several issues included in civil society's first model National Action Plan were incorporated in the government's second NAP.