Reducing Secrecy

Reducing Secrecy

Excessive secrecy has long been a problem in the fields of national and homeland security because it limits information sharing and leaves us less safe as a nation. Both the 9/11 Commission and the congressional Joint Inquiry into 9/11 recommended reforms to reduce unnecessary secrets. OpenTheGovernment.org works with our partners, the Administration, and Congress to put policies in place that both protect constitutional rights and ensure national security by better protecting real secrets and improving information sharing.

OTG pushes Archivist to preserve Senate torture report

Following reports that the CIA inspector general's office had "mistakenly" destroyed it's only copy of the Senate torture report, OpenTheGovernment.org sent a follow-up to the April 28th letter in which groups called on the Archivist of the United States to ensure the preservation of the report.

Death toll from violent cops is a guessing game

By: Patrice McDermott

Originally published by USA Today

Add two more killings to the Chicago police death toll from this weekend in a familiar story. Unarmed people, mostly black men, shot by police. People, mostly black, dying in police custody. Over the past year, the consciousness of the American public has been seared with these stunning facts and shocking images. The deaths, and other instances of police violence that disproportionately target African-American communities, have fueled demands for greater transparency in reporting by police forces nationwide.

New Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act being drafted in secret

Background: Over the past year, the openness community has joined privacy and civil liberties groups in fighting the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), legislation that undermines transparency and enhances surveillance while doing little to improve the government’s ability to combat cyber threats.