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Reducing Secrecy

Excessive secrecy has long been a problem in the fields of national and homeland security because it limits information sharing and leaves us less safe as a nation. Both the 9/11 Commission and the congressional Joint Inquiry into 9/11 recommended reforms to reduce unnecessary secrets. OpenTheGovernment.org works with our partners, the Administration, and Congress to put policies in place that both protect constitutional rights and ensure national security by better protecting real secrets and improving information sharing.

OpenTheGovernment.org’s Statement on the Senate's Failure to Advance USA Freedom Act

OpenTheGovernment.org is disappointed at the Senate’s failure to advance the compromise version of the USA Freedom Act (S. 2685) last night. The bill contained important advances for transparency about surveillance, though they were only a first step towards the disclosures that are necessary to restore democratic accountability.

OpenTheGovernment.org Supports Passage of the USA Freedom Act, Opposes Any Amendments to Weaken the Bill

Over the summer, OpenTheGovernment.org and a group of other transparency organizations wrote to Senate leadership to request that they allow a floor vote on the Senate compromise version of the USA FREEDOM Act, without any changes that weaken the text.

Groups to National Archives: Don’t Let the CIA Destroy Its Emails

OpenTheGovernment.org and 16 other open government, civil liberties and human rights groups have asked the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to reject a CIA request for increased authority to destroy email records.

Members of Congress, Office of Special Counsel, and More File Amicus Briefs in Support of Whistleblower

Federal Air Marshall Robert MacLean blew the whistle when the Department of Homeland Security canceled long distance air marshal coverage during a heightened terrorist alert. Three years later, the MacLean was fired and the text message informing him of the planned cancellation was retroactively designated as Sensitive Security Information.

What's the Legal Basis for Strikes in Syria?

Last night, the United States began bombing targets in Syria. Whatever the policy merits of these strikes, there are crucial unanswered questions about their legal justification.

Four Members of Congress join OpenTheGovernment.org and Other Groups In Seeking End to Secret Legal Interpretations of Executive Order 12333

OpenTheGovernment.org, four members of Congress, and over forty other civil society organizations wrote to President Obama and the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) asking for a thorough investigation of the NSA’s surveillance under Executive Order 12333. The letter, organized by Access, states in part:

Congress Must Reform Itself to Change the CIA's Culture of Secrecy

Last week we, together with our partner the Project On Government Oversight (POGO) and others, called on President Obama to request CIA Director John Brennan's resignation. This request was made in light of the disturbing confirmation that CIA employees improperly accessed records of investigators from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the CIA's lack of candor about the situation.

Congressmen Introduce Legislation to Reform Classification, Security Clearances

Senator Ron Wyden and Congressman Bennie G. Thompson introduced the Clearance and Over-Classification Reform and Reduction Act (CORRECT Act) in July. The legislation would, among other things, strengthen the Public Interest Declassification Board and require the President to set a goal to reduce classification by 10 percent or more in five years. The bill text (H.R.

The Classified Section

Check out our new blog, The Classified Section, for analysis of national security secrecy.

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